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These seven publications are currently open to submissions for speculative fiction, horror, erotica, poetry, general fiction and nonfiction. All are paying markets.

Before you submit, take a tour of their websites to see if your work will be a good fit.
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Timeless Tales exclusively publishes retellings of fairy tales and myths  in any genre. They don't accept original fairy tales or stories outside of their current theme. The next theme is "Perseus and Medusa." This is a family-friendly publication. No erotica. Length: Up to 2,000 words. Under 1,500 preferred. Payment: $15 flat fee. Accepts simultaneous submissions and reprints. Submission deadline: March 23, 2015. Read submission guidelines HERE.

Podcastle is an audio fantasy magazine open to all subgenres of fantasy: from magical realism to urban fantasy to slipstream to high fantasy, and everything in between. The theme for the next issue is Dirty Jobs. "All around us, hidden from view, people do the hidden jobs that no one knows about, the hard jobs that no one glamorizes, the secret jobs that everyone pretends do not exist. We prefer stories with strong pacing, well-defined characters, engaging dialogue, and clear action. As we publish primarily in audio, we strongly gravitate toward stories with distinctive voices that read well. Fun and humor are encouraged." Payment:  $100 for short stories between 2000-6000 words for weekly broadcast. 6 cents per word for original fiction, and 2 cents per word for reprints. For flash fiction stories under 1000 words, flat fee of $20. Submission deadline: March 30, 2015. Read submission guidelines HERE.

Sycamore Review, a publication of Purdue University, accepts unsolicited submissions of fiction, poetry, and non-fiction. No previously published works (except for translations) or genre pieces (conventional science fiction, romance, horror, etc.). Simultaneous submissions accepted. Payment: For unsolicited printed work, Sycamore Review pays each contributor two copies, and $50 per short story or non-fiction piece, or $25 per poem. Submission deadline: March 31, 2015. Read submission guidelines HERE.

Ladylit is an independent fiction publisher based in Hong Kong focusing mainly on lesbian erotica and romance. They are looking for stories for their upcoming anthology: "Summer Love: Lesbian Stories of Holiday Romance." Genre: Erotica. 
Preferred length: 3000 – 6000 words. Payment: US$45.00 plus 1 copy of e-book and paperback. Deadline: March 31, 2015 (the earlier the better). Read submission guidelines HERE.

Third Flatiron is looking for speculative fiction submissions to its themed anthology, "Only Disconnect." Presentism as a theme: the pitfalls of distraction, overstimulation, attention thieves. Too much to do, too little time, headlong into the singularity. Advantages of being bored or being "in the present." Are we becoming ADD? Should we disconnect - or connect even further? Length: Stories should be between 1,500 and 3,000 words. Payment: 3 cents per word, or 6 cents per word if chosen as the lead story. Submission deadline: March 31, 2015. Read submission guidelines HERE.

Another Dimension Magazine is the evolution of Wily Writers Speculative Fiction Podcast. It has a more focused theme, that of classic-style Horror and Dark Fantasy. "One thing, in particular, that we’re looking for in the stories is a strong, twisty ending—like they used to have on the Twilight Zone and Night Gallery shows." Word count: 1000 – 3000 (Firm. Do not query). Simultaneous submissions and reprints are okay. Payment: 3 cents a word. Submission deadline: March 31, 2015. Read submission guidelines HERE.

Kill Your Darlings is an Australian literary magazine that "is proud to publish writers at varying stages of their careers, from new and emerging voices to established and well-known writers." Payment: minimum payment for a lead feature commentary is $550, commentary is $200, fiction is $250, and reviews $200. Killings columnists are paid $90 per post, for a year-long contract. Submission deadline: March 31, 2015. Read submission guidelines HERE.

 
 
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HarperCollins

From the website:

HarperCollins is inviting unsolicited manuscripts from aspiring authors in Australia, New Zealand and around the world. Whether or not you’ve been previously published, this is the perfect opportunity to submit your work and have a chance to be published by an award-winning, international publishing house.

Our online submissions scheme, The Wednesday Post, is ready to uncover the best voices writing today. All entries will be considered for both print and ebook publication as well as digital-only publication.

Every Wednesday, we will accept submissions through the website. Submissions must be sent through this portal and should meet all the guidelines outlined below. Please note that submissions sent by post or email will NOT be considered for publication.

If we are interested in seeing more of your work, we will contact you within four weeks. Unfortunately we do not have the capacity to provide feedback for unsuccessful submissions.

We are currently looking for: Adult fiction, particularly commercial women’s fiction, erotica, romance and young adult fiction. Non Fiction including memoirs, biographies, narrative histories and illustrated non-fiction.

We are not currently accepting: plays, poetry, short stories, essays, mind body spirit, religious titles, health and fitness, children’s books and educational texts.

When you submit to The Wednesday Post, we will ask you to supply.

• a synopsis of your work

• the first 50 pages or first three chapters of your manuscript

• a short note about yourself

Submit HERE.

Note 8AM on Wednesday EST is midnight on THURSDAY in Australia.

 
 
Here are two new agents seeking clients. Amanda Leuck of Spencerhill Associates is looking for literary and commercial YA, new adult fiction, urban fantasy, and romance in all genres, including edgy romantic suspense, contemporary and paranormal. Victoria Selvaggio of Jennifer De Chiara Literary is looking for all genres (lyrical picture books, middle grade and young adult fiction, new adult, mysteries, suspense, thrillers, paranormal, fantasy, narrative nonfiction, adult fiction), thrillers and all elements of weird, creepy stuff.
Amanda Leuck of Spencerhill Associates

About Amanda: Amanda Leuck started her career in various facets of the media, including work on a TV talk show, at a fashion magazine, as a print journalist, and as an on-air traffic reporter. After graduating from New York University, Amanda went on to study literacy and literature at the post-graduate level. It was then that she developed a passion for the publishing industry. Amanda started at Spencerhill Associates as an editorial assistant, and was promoted to agent in August 2014. Her Twitter handle is @MandiLeone.

What she is seeking: strong, character-driven stories, written with an unforgettable voice. She is looking for literary and commercial YA, new adult fiction, urban fantasy, and romance in all genres, including edgy romantic suspense, contemporary and paranormal with a fresh twist.

How to submit: Send all submissions to submission [at] spencerhillassociates.com. Send the query letter in the body of the email. Address the query to Amanda. Include the pitch, and information about past publishing credits in the letter. Attach a detailed synopsis, and attach the first three chapter in .doc, rtf or txt format to the email.

Victoria Selvaggio of Jennifer De Chiara Literary

About Victoria: Victoria A. Selvaggio joins The Jennifer De Chiara Literary Agency as an Associate Agent with a strong background in business ownership and over six years of actively working as a volunteer and Regional Advisor for SCBWI: Northern Ohio. Drawn to the publishing scene first as an author writing all genres, with her most recent publication in the 2015 Children’s Writer’s and Illustrator’s Market, Vicki’s passion for honing the craft carried over into reading manuscripts for the agency. Currently, she is excited to read compelling manuscripts that will resonate with her long after she’s done.

What she is seeking: “I am currently looking for all genres (lyrical picture books, middle grade and young adult fiction, new adult, mysteries, suspense, thrillers, paranormal, fantasy, narrative nonfiction, adult fiction), but find I’m drawn to middle grade and young adult. I especially love thrillers and all elements of weird, creepy stuff. If it’s out of the box, and it will make me think and think, long after I’m done reading, send it to me. On the flip side, I yearn for books that make me laugh, cry and wonder about the world.”

How to submit: Please e-mail a query to vselvaggio [at] windstream.net. Put “Query” in the subject line of your e-mail. For queries regarding children’s and adult fiction, please send the first twenty pages in the body of your e-mail, along with a one-paragraph bio and a one-paragraph synopsis.

For queries regarding a nonfiction book, please attach the entire proposal as a Word document (the proposal should include a sample chapter), along with a one-paragraph bio and a one-paragraph synopsis of your book in the body of your email.

“I usually respond within three to six months. If you haven’t received a response after six months, feel free to query me again.”
 
 
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March is a popular month for conferences. Shaw Guides lists 27 conferences this month, including annual events for several state and national writers organizations.

The larger conferences are jam-packed with speakers, workshops, book signings, readings, and, of course, pitch sessions with agents.

But there are also smaller, more intimate gatherings this month, focused on the craft of writing and niche markets.

Registration is still open for all of these conferences. You can see their full schedule of events by clicking on the links.
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Puerto Vallarta International Writers Conference 2015, March 6-8, Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. Speakers: Elise Capron of Dijkstra Agency, Caleb Pirtle III, Sarah Cortez, James R. Callan, Carmen Rodriguez, Thomas Pulley, Donna Dahl, Melissa Frost, Evelyn Bryn.

LA Writers Conference 2015, March 14, 2015. Los Angeles, CA. "Learn how to sell your book idea in the boot camp and practice your pitch to an agent in the pitch session. Led by brand specialist and book consultant, Ruth Klein."

EPICon-2015, March 12 - 14, 2015, Menger Hotel, San Antonio, Texas. This conference is truly epic, with workshops on marketing, book production, distribution, sales, and information on epublishing from the top experts in the field.

New York Writers Workshop Fiction Pitch Conference, March 13-15, 2015, Ripley-Grier Studios (NY Spaces) 520 Eighth Ave (36th/37th), 16th Fl. Participants polish their pitches with the help of conference leaders who are members of the New York Writers Workshop faculty, then they present them to three different editors from major New York publishing houses. Editors provide feedback and may request proposals and manuscripts after the conference.

Virginia Festival of the Book, March 18-22, 2015. Book exhibits, talks by authors, readings, workshops on book promotion, finding an agent, poetry, publishing, agents roundtable - you name it, this conference has it.

Algonkian Writers New York Pitch Conference, March 19-22, 2015. "The event focuses on the art of the novel pitch as the best method not only for communicating your work, but for having you and your work taken seriously by industry professionals. More importantly though, it is also a diagnostic method for workshopping the plot, premise, and other elements of the story to determine quality and marketability. Simply put, you cannot successfully pitch a viable commercial novel if you don't have a viable commercial novel. Our goal, therefore, is to set you on a realistic path to publication. "

Create Something Magical Conference, March 21 - 22, 2015. Iselin, NJ. The conference includes a writers track, a readers track, book fair, author signings, workshops, editor and agent appointments, and social events. Ten agents from NY agencies, and seven agents will be attending. Click HERE for a checklist of agent preferences (genres they represent).

PubSense Summit, March 22-24, Charleston, SC. Featuring keynote speakers Cevin Bryerman, publisher of Publishers Weekly, and Joanna Penn, best-selling author and founder of The Creative Penn. Workshops on: how editors/agents can further your publishing goals, steps to build your author platform, brand and persona, insights from publishing pros including agents, editors, marketers and social media gurus, where book publishing and marketing is headed right now, how to build book sales through reviewers, mass media and book clubs, today’s methods of crowdfunding, using discoverability tools and increasing distribution. Featuring keynote speakers Cevin Bryerman, publisher of Publishers Weekly, and Joanna Penn, best-selling author and founder of The Creative Penn.

The Chesapeake Writing Conferences, Baltimore (March 27) and Washington DC (March 28)  a full-day of  “How to Get Published” workshops. Attending agents: Jeff Kleinman (Folio Literary); Ella Kennen (Corvisiero Literary); Jamie Bodnar Drowley (Inklings Literary); Laura Strachan (The Strachan Literary Agency).

Northern Colorado Writers Conference, Mar 27 - 28, 2015, Fort Collins CO. Sessions: script writing, self-publishing, maximizing sales, agent roundtables, children's books, writing for TV, building your author platform, how to write an effective hook, and more.

California Dreamin' Writers Conference, Mar 27 - 29, 2015, Brea CA. Agents attending: Laura Bradford (Bradford Literary Agency), Courtney Miller-Callihan (Greenburger Associates), Lucienne Diver (The Knight Agency); editors from Avon Romance, Boroughs Publishing Group, Entangled Publishing, ImaJinn/Belle Books, Random House, and Samhaim Publishing. Over 60 workshops: writing, publishing business, pitching to agents, book covers, and anything else you can think of.

Writers' Day, March 28. Hooksett, NH. Workshops and seminars led by professional writers, editors, agents, and publishers. The conference includes the option of face-to-face manuscript critiques and agent/publisher one-on-one pitch sessions.

 
 
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March is a long, cold month that has Ides. (They all do, but the Ides of March is Shakespearian.) It's a great time to focus on writing, and all that getting published entails.

There are lots of writing contests with deadlines in March (some even fall on the Ides), and they cover the spectrum from poetry to Hoosier lit. Short story contests abound.

So, don't be shy. Take a chance and enter a contest. Who knows, you may win!

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The Naomi Long Madgett Poetry Award is sponsored by Broadside Lotus Press. Restrictions: This competition is open to African American poets only. If you have already had a book published by Lotus Press, you are ineligible. However, inclusion in a Lotus Press anthology does not disqualify you. Genres: Poetry collections of approximately 60-90 pages. Prize: $500 in cash and publication  by Broadside Lotus Press within the first three months of 2016 as well as free copies and discounts. Deadline: March 1, 2015. How to enter: Read submission guidelines HERE.

Wicwas Anthology 2015Genres: Beekeeping stories (fiction and nonfiction). Restrictions: US residents only. Prize: First prize - $500.00; Second prize - $300.00; Third prize - $200.00. Deadline: March 1, 2015. How to enter: Read submission guidelines HERE.

Ottawa Magazine Short Fiction ContestRestrictions: Open only to residents of Ottawa. Genre: Entries must be no longer than 3,000 words. Entries can be short stories or excerpts but must not have been published elsewhere. Prize: The winner will receive $700, the runner up $300, and both stories will be published in the Summer 2015 issue of Ottawa MagazineDeadline: March 1, 2015. How to enter: Read submission guidelines HERE.

2015 RBC Bronwen Wallace Award for Emerging WritersGenre: Poetry. Restrictions: Candidates must be: A Canadian citizen or permanent resident; Under the age of 35 as of March 2, 2015; Previously published in an independently edited magazine or anthology; Unpublished in book form and without a book contract. Prizes: Winner: $5,000; Finalists: $1,000. Deadline: March 2, 2015. How to enter: Read submission guidelines HERE.

The John Gardner Fiction Award is sponsored by the Binghamton Center for Writers-State University of New York with support from the Office of the Dean of Binghamton University's Harpur College of the Arts & Sciences. Genre: Novel or collection of fiction published in 2014. Prizes: Winner: $1,000. Deadline: March 1, 2015. How to enter: Read submission guidelines HERE.

NEA Literature Fellowships are sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts. Prize: $25,000 grants in prose (fiction and creative nonfiction) and poetry to published creative writers that enable recipients to set aside time for writing, research, travel, and general career advancement. Deadline: March 11, 2015. How to enter: Read submission guidelines HERE.

McLaughlin-Esstman-Stearns First Novel Prize is awarded to the a author of the best first novel published in the previous calendar year (2014). Restrictions: Only American authors publishing in English are eligible. Non-eligible books include short story collections, flash fiction, memoirs, biographies and books published solely in electronic format. Prize: $500. Deadline: March 15, 2015. How to enter: Read submission guidelines HERE.

The Lakefly Writers Conference Writing ContestRestrictions: Open to residents of Wisconsin only. Genres: Short story fiction:  2500 words or less. Any genre that includes the theme: Temptation Flash fiction:  500 words or less; any genre. First Five Pages:  A maximum of the first five pages of an original, unpublished novel; any genre. It must be accompanied by a two-paragraph synopsis. The novel does not need to be completed at the time of submission. The Jean Nelson Essay: 2500 words or less. Theme: Literary character I would most like to meet. Prizes: First place winners will receive a cash prize of $100; second place winners will receive $75; and third place winners will receive $50. Deadline: March 15, 2015. How to enter: Read submission guidelines HERE.

The Modern Love Contest, sponsored by the New York Times, is inviting college students nationwide to open their hearts and laptops and write an essay that describes what love is like for them today. Restrictions: Open to college students. Genre: Essay (1,500 to 1,700 words). Prize: The winning author will receive $1,000 and his or her essay will be published in a special Modern Love column in May 2015, and on nytimes.com. Deadline: 3/15/2015. How to enter: Read submission guidelines HERE.

The Eugene & Marilyn Glick Indiana Authors Award seeks to elevate the written arts in Indiana. Restrictions: Any living published writer who was born in Indiana or has lived in Indiana for at least five years will be eligible. Authors who have published works of fiction, prose, poetry and/or non-fiction are eligible; reference works, scholarly monographs and books of photography will not be considered. Self-published authors are considered. Prize: National Author: $10,000 cash prize and $2,500 grant for his or her hometown Indiana public library. Regional Author: $7,500 cash prize and $2,500 grant for his or her hometown Indiana public library. Emerging Author: $5,000 cash prize and $2,500 grant for his or her hometown Indiana public library.. Deadline: March 20, 2015. How to enter: Read submission guidelines HERE.

2015 Short Story Contest - Lost VoicesGenre: Stories must be Science Fiction, Fantasy, or Horror genre. Stories must be original, unpublished, unsold and no more than 3500 words in length. Prizes: First Prize:  $200, and story published in the 2015 Confluence program book. Second Prize: $100 Third Prize:  $50. Deadline: 3/31/2015. How to enter: Read submission guidelines HERE.

The BEVEL SUMMERS PRIZE for Short Short Stories will be awarded to a short short (under 1000 words) submitted between March 15 and March 31, 2015. Send up to three stories.  The winner and finalists will be published in the fall 2015 issue of ShenandoahPrize: $1000. Deadline: 3/31/2015. How to enter: Print submissions only. Read submission guidelines HERE.

 
 
Here are two new agents actively seeking writers. Heather Flaherty (Bent Agency) is looking for children’s, middle grade, and young adult fiction and nonfiction, as well as select new adult fiction, and pop-culture or humorous nonfiction. Sarah Nagel (Writers House) is looking for psychological thrillers, horror, mystery, suspense, literary fiction, realistic Young Adult and Middle Grade with a hint of magical realism, and for nonfiction - medical ethics, true crime, humor books and memoir.
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Heather Flaherty of The Bent Agency

About Heather: “I grew up in Massachusetts, between Boston and the Cape, and started working in New York City as a playwright during college. This pushed me towards English as a focus, and after a lot of country-hopping in my early twenties, I wound up finally beginning my publishing career in editorial, specifically at Random House in the UK. That’s also where I became a YA and children’s literary scout, which finally landed me back in NYC, consulting with foreign publishers and Hollywood regarding what the next big book will be. Now as an agent, I’m thrilled to turn my focus on growing authors for that same success.”

What she is seeking: Children’s, middle grade, and young adult fiction and nonfiction, as well as select new adult fiction, and pop-culture or humorous nonfiction.

“Currently I’m looking for YA fiction across-the-board, though my heart does sway towards issue-related YA with humor and heart – not depressing, or mopey. I also love love love hard, punchy, contemporary YA that’s got no hesitations when it comes to crazy. I’m also always up for seeing contemporary stories with sci-fi or fantasy elements, as well as a clever respin of an old or classic tale. And then, lastly, really good horror and ghost stories… not gory-for-gory’s sake or overly disgusting, but cringing, dark, bloody twisted, and even lovely. That said, the one thing I love above all else in a YA novel, regardless of sub-genre, is a strong and specific character voice. A real person, not another ‘everygirl.’ 

As for the middle grade I’m looking for, I want it stark, honest, and even dark; either contemporary or period, as long as it’s accessible. Coming-of-age stories, dealing-with-difficulty stories, witness stories (adult issues seen through the child’s p.o.v kinda thing), anything that makes you want to hold the narrator’s hand… for your own comfort, as well as their’s. I am also ok with these stories having slight magical or fantasy elements as well – as long as they’re subtle. In new adult, I like to see story… not just romance and/or erotica. For me, it should pretty much be a great YA novel for an older audience. On the nonfiction side, I’m looking for strong teen memoirs about overcoming crushing situations. ”

How to submit: Read The Bent Agency’s updated submissions guidelines online, and then e-mail flahertyqueries [at] thebentagency.com.
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Sarah Nagel of Writers House

About Sarah: Sarah Nagel joined Writers House in 2011 to work with Senior Vice President, Merrilee Heifetz and is now actively building her own client list. Previously, Sarah was a media lawyer in London and graduated with two separate degrees in English Language and Literature, and Law. Follow Sarah on Twitter: @SarahNagel14.

What she is seeking: Sarah is looking for psychological thrillers (those that mess with your head rather than high speed cross-country chases), horror, mystery, suspense and literary fiction. Sarah is especially interested in strong character-driven fiction and stories that explore the dynamics of a dysfunctional family unit / relationships. Sarah also represents realistic Young Adult and Middle Grade with a hint of magical realism. On the nonfiction side, Sarah is interested in medical ethics, true crime, humor books and memoir with a distinctive narrative voice with a universal resonance. Sarah is not looking for straight sci-fi, high fantasy, romance or picture books.

How to submit: “I accept e-mail queries and will usually respond within 4-6 weeks. Please submit your query, including the first ten (10) pages of your manuscript pasted into the body of the e-mail (no attachments please!), to snagel [at] writershouse.com with “QUERY FOR SARAH NAGEL: [TITLE OF MANUSCRIPT]” in the subject line. Please do not query multiple Writers House agents simultaneously.”

 
 
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Anthologies are themed collections of short stories and/or poems by various authors and published as a single book. In most cases, anthologies are put out by publishing houses, but sometimes anthologies are published by magazines as well. Anthologies are also printed by vanity presses. (Don't submit to those. Vanity presses demand payment, and they will do nothing but harm your career.)

It is a good idea to get your work into a (legitimate) print anthology for several reasons: 1) Publishing houses that put out anthologies generally get a wider distribution than magazines; 2) Print anthologies don't preclude publishing your story online, or on Amazon, later on;  3) Establishing a relationship with a publishing house may pan out later when you are ready to publish your book; 4) Anthologies are a great writing credit; 5) Many anthologies accept reprints, which will extend the life of your stories.

Below are eight publishers looking for speculative fiction short stories. Their requirements are fairly narrow (please read their submissions pages carefully). All of these are paying markets, ranging from pro (6 cents a word, minimum), to semi-pro.

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World Weaver Press is publishing a second edition of the Far Orbit science fiction adventure series.

Deadline: March 31, 2015.

"We are once again looking for modern space adventures crafted in the Grand Tradition. We are not looking for slavish imitations of past classics. Rather, we would like to receive stories that establish a new tradition in the much maligned Scifi adventure genera — smart, modern stories built around the classic traditions. We are looking for adventure stories that are creative, readable, and memorable. We are also looking for midnight indulgences; exciting stories that transport you from the everyday grind and leave you wondrously satisfied. All adventure-based sci-fi genera are welcome but stay away from fantasy elements unless they are genetically engineered or cybernetic. Stories can begin on Earth but the major action should happen out there, beyond the edges of our blue marble. Dystopia (Mad Max) and fantasy-like adventures (John Carter of Mars) have to be very special to be included in this anthology. Please, no fan fiction."

Rights and compensation: Payment: $0.01/word. All contributors will receive a paperback copy of the anthology. For previously unpublished works: Seeking first world rights in English and exclusive rights to publish in print and electronic format for twelve months after publication date after which publisher retains nonexclusive right to continue to publish for a term. For reprints: Seeking non-exclusive right to publish in print and electronic formats for a term. Previously unpublished stories preferred; reprints will be considered. No previously anthologized stories.

Open submission period: January 1 – March 31, 2015.

Length: Under 10,000 words

Submission method: Paste the story into the body of the e-mail message. Include the approximate word count. Subject line: Apogee – [Title]. Send submission to: farorbit [at] worldweaverpress [dot] com.

Simultaneous submissions = OK.

Multiple submissions = No.

For more information CLICK HERE.
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Crossed Genres Publications is publishing Hidden Youth: Speculative Fiction from the Margins of History

Deadline: 4/30/15

Who can submit: "We welcome stories by authors from all walks of life. We especially encourage submissions from members of marginalized groups within the speculative fiction community, including (but not limited to) people of color; people who are not from or living in the U.S.A.; QUILTBAG and GSM people; people with disabilities, chronic illness, or mental illness; and atheists, agnostics, and members of religious minorities. The protagonists of your story do not have to mirror your own heritage, identities, beliefs, or experiences. We also especially encourage short story submissions from people who don’t usually write in this format, including poets, playwrights, essayists and authors of historical fiction and historical romance."

Submission deadline and publication schedule: Submissions are due April 30, 2015. If it’s still April 30 in your time zone, you’re good. Acceptance notices will be sent by October 1. The anthology is tentatively slated for a January 2016 release.

Pay and rights: USD 6¢/word for global English first publication rights in print and digital format. The author retains copyright. Payment is upon publication.

For more information CLICK HERE.
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Meerkat Press is currently seeking short stories for their next themed anthology, Love Hurts.

"Dazzle us with stories of love, and make it hurt! Slow, dull, unimaginative stories need not apply."

Deadline: 4/30/15

Genres accepted: Speculative Fiction, Science Fiction and Fantasy. This includes all sub-genres: Dystopian, Steampunk, Paranormal, etc.

Payment: .01 to .04 per word for short fiction.

For more information CLICK HERE.
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Pop Seagull Publishing is publishing the anthology: ‘Robotica.’

Deadline: March 2015

"Wow us with your take on the intersection between eroticism and robots or other artificial life forms! This could take the form of a look at robotic self-replication, humans in love with robots, robot courtship, or anything your imagination can come up with! Just take ‘Robotica’ and run with it. We’re not necessarily looking for pure erotica, but more solid science fiction that examines the intersection of sexuality and robots in a unique way. Having said that, have fun with it! If a sexy, sexy scene suits the story, go for it."

Payment: For short fiction, 1 cent per word, plus three free copies of the book and a discounted rate on future purchases.

How to submit: Microsoft Word files (.doc and .docx), PDF and Open Office (.odt) files only. If you send anything other than these formats, they may not be able to open it. E-subs only. Please send all queries and works for consideration to lizmclean(dot)artist(at)gmail(dot)com.

For more information CLICK HERE.
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Science Fiction and Fantasy Publications is publishing their Unbound anthology “Lost Friends

Deadline: March 31st, 2015.

Genre: Science Fiction.

Payment: All short stories are paid at $0.01 per word (after editing) up to a maximum of $150.00. All payments will be made via PayPal and in the first quarter of publication. Then, if the issue your story is included in breaks a profit, 50% of the net profit will be shared between the contributors on a per word basis for two years after the publication date.

How to submit: You only need two things – Your short story and a small two paragraph bio of yourself. This should be supplied with your manuscript. Attach both to an email entitled “Short Story Submission” indicating which anthology you are submitting to and send it to our submissions email address. This email address is set to delete emails with no attachments.

For more information CLICK HERE.
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Eldritch Press is publishing "Steampunk Horror: The Lost Worlds"

Deadline: Extended until filled.

Genre: "The Lost Worlds" will be a anthology in the Steampunk Horror Genre devoted to the post-apocalyptic theme. Send us worlds rebuilt by steam powered engines and mechanical marvels. Send us characters we can root for as they fight the good fight. Send us worlds our readers can romanticize about, characters that jump off the page. We want to set the Steampunk world ablaze with "The Lost Worlds."

Payment: Eight cents a word.

How to submit: Email with Attachments: submissions@eldritchpress.com

For more information CLICK HERE.
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Strange Musings Press is accepting submissions for their new Anthology, Alternate Hilarities 3: Hysterical Realms

Deadline: March 10th

Genre: Short funny fiction about fantasy worlds of all types. They are looking for Flash Fiction between 500 and 1500 words. Short Fiction between 1501 and 6000 words.

Payment: Flash Fiction - a half cent a word paid on publication as well as one E-book and 1 share of royalties. Short Fiction - One cent a word paid on publication as well as one E-book and 2 shares of royalties.

How to submit: Submissions@StrangeMusingsPress.com

Simultaneous submissions: Yes

Reprints: Yes

For more information CLICK HERE.
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Emby Press is publishing Monster Hunter: Wasteland

"The wars are over. The monsters have won.There is nowhere monsters don’t stalk anymore; not the burnt out cities or desolate countryside. The monster’s endless search for the last of humanity grows intense as the number of people dwindle and the legions of hungry creatures swell.

The battle between life and death is constant. No place is safe. But, the people who have survived are the fastest, the strongest and the most resourceful. Among them are the last monster hunters: individuals that have visited the depths of nightmare and survived. Individuals that have become the things that haunt those nightmares…

They will never submit, no matter how large or small the gain. Their purpose is clear… Hunt the monsters. Reclaim the WASTELAND."

Deadline: 3/1/15. Acceptances will be announced 4/5/14

Tentative Publication Date: Fall 2015

Payment: $25.00 and electronic copy of the book upon publication.

Word Limits: 2000 to 8000 words. Please query if longer.

Format: Submissions should be .doc (.docx is fine) or .rtf formats. The entire text will be reformatted, so no need to worry about margins, spacing, etc. Please use a standard font.

Genres Accepted: Dark Fiction, Horror and sci-fi.

Reprints Accepted: Yes. Please include a history of publication with your submission.

Simultaneous Subs: (submitting to Emby and another press at the same time) can be avoided by requesting an early response.

For more information CLICK HERE.

 
 
PictureBoth men and women enjoy nonfiction.
MarketWatch recently trumpeted this headline: "The huge difference between what men and women read." You can always get readers to open an article about the differences between men and women - after all, I did - because apparently we have not yet figured out what they are.

There are, as I have long suspected, differences between men and women.

According the the National Endowment of the Arts, men are more likely to read nonfiction books than fiction, while the opposite holds true for women: 55% of women read fiction in 2012, and 48% read nonfiction.

The real news here is not that 7% more women read fiction than nonfiction, or that more women than men read fiction.  It is the steady decline in the total fiction-reading population.
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The waning literary leanings of American adults

Year           Percentage of adults who read fiction

1982           56.40%

1992           54.20%

2002           46.60%

2008           50.20%

2012           46.90%

A ten point drop may not appear to be much, but in sheer numbers it represents a LOT of people. (Someone else will have to do the math, But given an adult population of roughly 230 million, I am sure it's more than, say, a hundred.)
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The huge difference between what men and women read

MarketWatch, Published: Jan 29, 2015 3:25 p.m. ET

Most Americans don’t read fiction, but the residents of some U.S. states are far bigger bookworms than others.

The number of adults who read at least one novel, play or poem within the past 12 months fell to 47% in 2012 from 50% in 2008, according to a new survey of over 37,000 Americans, “A Decade of Arts Engagement,” by the National Endowment for the Arts, a government agency that promotes artistic excellence.

Fiction reading rose from 2002 to 2008, but has been dropping ever since — and is now back to 2002 levels. By comparison, 30 years ago 56% of Americans read fiction. The decline in fiction reading last year occurred mostly among white Americans, including women and men of various educational backgrounds; rates held steady among non-white and Hispanic groups, the report found.

Men are more likely to read nonfiction books than fiction, while the opposite holds true for women: 55% of women read fiction in 2012, and 48% read nonfiction, according to an update of a previous NEA report released in 2013. Young adults are more likely to read fiction than nonfiction books, whereas the oldest Americans (aged 75 and older) are more likely to read nonfiction books, the NEA found. Literary reading varied widely from state-to-state: It was 63% in Washington state, far above the national average, and 56% in Colorado, Rhode Island and Connecticut, but just 34% in Alabama, 36% in Virginia and 37% in Nevada.

Read more here...


 
 
Here are two new agents actively seeking clients. Lane Heymont is especially interested in sci-fi and fantasy. Caitie Flum is looking for historical fiction, mysteries/thrillers of all kinds, magical realism, and memoirs. Caitie is also looking for Young Adult and New Adult projects, particularly romance, historical fiction, mysteries and thrillers, and contemporary books with diverse characters.
Lane Heymont of The Seymour Agency

About Lane: Serving as a literary assistant for the past two years at The Seymour Agency, Lane Heymont has led the marketing efforts for their authors and enjoyed connecting clients with readers. As a lover of literature since childhood, he decided to pursue his passion as a literary agent to bring more well written books to the masses. With a bachelor’s degree in Psychology, business and literature, Lane continued his education in Creative Writing and English, attending Harvard. Lane is a member of HWA, ITW, and AAR membership is pending. He believes what John Gregory Dunne said: “Writing is manual labor of the mind.”

What he is seeking: science fiction and fantasy (exceptional world building is a must), and nonfiction (the inspiring, intriguing, mysterious, and scientific).

How to submit: Send all queries to lane [at] theseymouragency.com. The subject line should be “QUERY: (Title)”. Please past the first five pages in the body of the e-mail.

Caitie Flum of Liza Dawson Associates

About Caitie
: Caitie Flum joined Liza Dawson Associates in July 2014 as assistant and audio rights manager. She graduated from Hofstra University in 2009 with a BA in English with a concentration in publishing studies. Caitie interned at Hachette Book Group and Writers House. She was an Editorial Assistant then Coordinator for Bookspan, where she worked on several clubs including the Book-of-the-Month Club, The Good Cook, and the Children’s Book-of-the-Month Club. She is taking on her own clients in 2015. 

What she is seeking: Caitie is looking for commercial and upmarket fiction with great characters and superb writing, especially historical fiction, mysteries/thrillers of all kinds, magical realism, and book club fiction.

Caitie is also looking for Young Adult and New Adult projects, particularly romance, historical fiction, mysteries and thrillers, and contemporary books with diverse characters.

In nonfiction, she is looking for memoirs that make people look at the world differently, narrative nonfiction that's impossible to put down, books on pop culture, theater, current events, women's issues, and humor.
She is not looking for science fiction, fantasy, westerns, military fiction, self-help, science, middle grade, or picture books.


How to submit:  Email your query in the body of the e-mail to querycaitie [at] lizadawsonassociates.com.
 
 
PictureConferences can get pretty wild. Don't forget your beret.
If you can afford to attend a writers conference, it may very well be the best investment you will ever make. Conferences offer writers a unique opportunity to share and learn from the experiences of other writers, as well as providing a platform to pitch to agents. (Many agents will only accept clients they have met at conferences.) Workshops run the gamut at these events, from how to market your self-published books to mistakes thriller writers make about firearms. You are guaranteed to emerge from a conference with not only more knowledge, but more confidence.

Because there are so many writers' organizations - regional, national and international - you should not have a problem finding a conference within reach. These are exciting, hugely invigorating events, and I would encourage every writer to attend one.

Related postsSchmooze or You Lose

Valuable Tips for Pitching to an Agent or Editor
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Indie Author Conference & Pitchapalooza Feb 1, 2015. Burton Barr Central Library 1221 North Central Avenue, Phoenix, Arizona 85004. Workshops galore. And as an extra feature, randomly selected people will have one minute (and one minute only) to present their best "elevator pitch" to a panel of book experts. One lucky author will win an introduction to a literary agent or publisher appropriate for his or her book. Judges and panelists: David Henry Sterry, Arielle Eckstut, Annette Rogers, and Gayle Shanks.Cost: $150.

The Kentucky Writers Conference, Feb. 6, 2015, Louisville, KY a full-day of “How to Get Published” workshops. Attending agents: Victoria Lea (Aponte Literary); Natalia Aponte (Aponte Literary); Brent Taylor (Triada US); and Alice Speilburg (Speilburg Literary).

Tennessee Writers Conference, Feb. 7, 2015, Nashville, TN a full-day of “How to Get Published” workshops. Attending agents: Greg Daniel (Daniel Literary); Lauren MacLeod (Strothman Agency); Brent Taylor (Triada US); Julie Gwinn (The Seymour Agency); and Cate Hart (Corvisiero Literary).

Genre-LA, dates TBA, are literary and screen writers conferences devoted to the craft and business of writing in one or more genres. It includes seminars, workshops, panels, pitch sessions and more, featuring educators, industry experts, best-selling authors, literary agents and publishers. Each year, it focuses on different genres, from Thrillers, Suspense, Crime, and Mysteries; Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror; to Romance -- Classic to Modern to Urban Fantasy, and more.

San Francisco Writers Conference, Feb. 12-15, 2015, San Francisco, CA. This is a huge event, with agents: 24 agents and 21 editors. You can see them all HERE.

Desert Nights, Rising Stars Conference,Thursday-Saturday Feb. 19 - 21. "The Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing hosts the Desert Nights, Rising Stars Writers Conference in Arizona State University’s historic quarter. The conference workshops, readings, and book signings will largely take place in the buildings near College Street and University Drive, on the north end of the main campus." Click HERE for a schedule of activities and events.

Portland Writers Workshop, Feb. 20, 2015, Portland, OR a full-day of “How to Get Published” workshops. Attending agents: Sandra Bishop (Transatlantic Agency); Adam O'Connor Rodriguez (Hawthorne Books); and Mary C. Moore (Kimberley Cameron & Associates).

Big Story Writers Conference, Feb 20-22. Conference to help you develop your plot into a BIG STORY with the potential to become a best-seller or box office success. Hands-on workshops, seminars and lectures that guide writers through the creative and developmental process. Fiction, nonfiction and screenplays.

The Writing Workshop of Seattle, Feb. 21, 2015, Seattle, WA a full-day of “How to Get Published” workshops. Attending agents: Kathleen Ortiz (New Leaf Literary); Kristin Vincent (D4EO Literary); Genevieve Nine (Andrea Hurst & Associates); and Fleetwood Robbins (Waxman Leavell Literary).

Sleuthfest, February 26, March 1, Deerfield Beach, Florida. Sponsored by Florida Chapter of Mystery Writers of America. Pitch to agents, critiques of 10-page manuscript submissions, Keynote address with James Patterson.


 

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